Can Kidney Stones Affect Your Prostate?

Every year more than 500,000 people seek emergency care for kidney stones. Kidney stones are hard mineral deposits that form within the kidneys when your body is not properly filtering waste and excess water. Kidney stones will eventually exit your body through the urinary tract. Kidney stones typically do not cause symptoms until they start to pass through the urinary tract. When kidney stones pass, it can be extremely painful and cause complications like blockages of the urinary tract, blood in the urine, and problems with the prostate. We’re taking a closer look at how kidney stones can affect your prostate.

What is the prostate?

The prostate is a gland that is located just below a man’s bladder. The tube that carries urine from the bladder and out of the body (the urethra) travels through the prostate. The main purpose of the prostate gland is reproductive. It is responsible for adding nutrients to sperm to help with fertilization of an egg.

Xray of a prostate

Can kidney stones affect your prostate?

Yes. If you have kidney stones that are blocking the flow of urine, it can result in your bladder retaining excess urine. When your bladder is retaining excess urine, it places pressure on your prostate and can lead to complications.

Can kidney stones cause prostatitis?

No. Prostatitis occurs when there is inflammation of the prostate. When the prostate is inflamed, it can be painful or difficult to urinate. If you have prostatitis, you may feel like you have to make frequent trips to the restroom, experience a persistent urge to urinate, or wake up at night to urinate. You may have general pelvic discomfort or pain in the testicles or anorectal region.

The most common causes of chronic prostatitis are autoimmune diseases, stress, and pelvic floor spasms. Causes of bacterial prostatitis include urinary tract infections, bladder infections, urinary retention, and prostate stones. Kidney stones are not associated with causing prostatitis.

Can kidney stones cause you not to ejaculate?

Yes. If a kidney stone is stuck in your urethra, below the ejaculatory duct, it can block ejaculation or cause painful ejaculation as semen pushes the stone through the urethra and out of the penis.

Do kidney stones affect sperm?

No. Sperm is part of the reproductive system and produced within the testes. Kidney stones form in the bladder and are part of the urinary system. Kidney stones do not affect sperm count or quality.

Can kidney stones affect your PSA count?

No. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a protein produced by cells in the prostate gland. A PSA test is performed through a simple blood draw and shows the PSA level in a man’s blood stream. Men who have prostate cancer often have an elevated PSA level. There are conditions that can result in high PSA levels that are not related to cancer. These include prostatitis and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

What is the difference between kidney stones and prostate stones?

Kidney stones are solid stones made of minerals that form within the kidneys when your body is having difficulty filtering excess water and waste. Kidney stones affect both men and women and can result in sudden, severe pain in the abdomen, side, or lower back, a burning sensation when you urinate, and problems with urination.

Prostate stones are poppy seed-sized stones that form within the prostate. Only men can have prostate stones. Some men may experience lower back pain or pain in the penis or perineum. Typically, prostate stones do not cause any problems or symptoms. However, if prostate stones become infected, it can lead to urinary tract infections or prostatitis.

Are kidney stones and prostate cancer related?

No. Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer among men in the United States. The exact cause of prostate cancer is unknown but there are risk factors that elevate your chances of developing prostate cancer. These include:

Age – You are more likely to develop prostate cancer if you are over the age of 50.

Family history – Prostate cancer seems to run in families. Having a father or brother with prostate cancer more than doubles your risk of developing it.

Race / ethnicity – Prostate cancer is more common in African-American men and Caribbean men of African ancestry than in men of other races.

Kidney stones are not an identified risk factor of developing prostate cancer. Recurrent kidney stones can cause other complications, like increasing your risk of developing chronic kidney disease.

Kidney stones, prostatitis, and prostate cancer can all cause difficult or painful urination, pain in your abdomen or pelvic area, and a frequent urge to urinate. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, it is important talk with your doctor. Your doctor can determine the cause of your symptoms and provide you with an individualized plan to begin treatment as soon as possible.

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